Foreign Relations of the United States : 1918 The November Revolution
The Ambassador in Russia (Francis) to the Secretary of State

File No. 861.00/661

The Ambassador in Russia (Francis) to the Secretary of State (1)


PETROGRAD, November 12, 1917, 10 p.m.

[Received November 16, 4.40 a.m.]

1974. Last cable from Department yesterday No. 1829, November 3[6]. Have sent daily cables giving conditions, some through Stockholm. Bolshevik government attempting to administer but have not taken charge of departments and continue issue orders from the Smolny Institute, Bolshevik headquarters. Have received no written or oral notice that new government administering affairs.

Kerensky reported with 60,000 troops ten miles distant. Was expected yesterday. One report is that he is attempting to negotiate with Petrograd garrison of 60,000 troops minimum great majority of whom are neutral. Another report is that he is under arrest by the troops with him and they are waiting for the coming of Alexeev, Kornilov or some man in whom they have more confidence. Still another report is that his troops are Bolshevik in sentiment and unwilling to fight their comrades. Only armed resistance to Bolsheviki here since the fall of Winter Palace 2 a. m., November 8, is Junkers or cadets from schools for officers. Many Junkers have been brutally murdered. One report is that only sixty-five of twelve [hundred] survive but think that exaggerated. Battalion of women aided Junkers to defend Winter Palace but surrendered with few casualties; hostilities resulting in their treatment after surrendering but none murdered. Telephone office captured by thirty-five Junkers yesterday but surrendered after occupation of eight hours. Bolshevik armed force consists of sailors, some soldiers and of armed workmen.


(1) Sent via the Legation in Sweden (No. 991). Vol. III, chap. iv. Back

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