Foreign Relations of the United States : 1918 The November Revolution
The Consul General at Moscow (Summers) to the Secretary of State

File No. 861.00/714

The Consul General at Moscow (Summers) to the Secretary of State


Moscow, November 23, 1917, 6 p.m.

[Received November 22, 2.10 p.m.]

85. Situation quiet but anarchy and confusion reign everywhere. On the one hand anti-Maximalist feeling growing on account of cruelties and atrocities committed during recent riots. On the other hand army and proletariat consider Allies responsible for continuation of the war. This is a direct result of German propaganda and the decentralizing and disintegrating forces at work in Russia are so great that the army will be unable to render Allies further assistance.

At Moscow banks are closed and business suspended. New disorders are daily expected. I am taking all possible steps to protect Americans and will if necessary send them away in which case I may have to draw on the Department for funds for the purpose.

As dean of the Consular Corps have demanded and secured exemption of foreigners' homes from search. All the Consulates have furnished their nationals safe-conducts with seal of the War Revolutionary Committee, also a document establishing status of their dwellings. Strict orders have been given by Revolutionary Committee to respect these documents which though irregular are absolutely necessary under present conditions. Am daily in contact with committee and firmly insisting on the strictest respect for the lives and property of foreigners.

Y.M.C.A. have done brave work here and their coolness has enabled us to avoid a panic.

Every one safe and relatively calm.


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